Posted by: seanmalstrom | October 25, 2016

Email: How was PSP still a failure?

Hello Master Malstrom,

could you please explain how PSP was a failure despite selling around 80
Mln. Units worldwide?

I’m just curious as to exactly why it still bombed.

Cheers,
The Glorious Reader

PSP was a handheld game console and a handheld media device (using UMD little discs). As a handheld media device, it failed. The UMDs were hyped to be the DVDs of mobile. They bombed. The iPod Video came out and then the smartphones which devastated any chance of it.

PSP was outselling the DS until Nintendogs, NSMB DS, Mario Kart DS, and Animal Crossing DS came out for it. From then on, PSP just declined as a handheld gaming console. It only found consistent market in Japan because Japan wants to buy everything mobile.

You have to understand, during this time Sony had come off of the success of the PS1 and PS2. Sega had gone out of console business. Everyone predicted Nintendo would leave consoles because Sony would take over the handheld market.

DS outsold the PSP. Does that mean the Wii could outsell the PS3?

“Cannot happen!” the hardcore gamers told us. “Handheld markets and home console markets are DIFFERENT.” Are they? They never explained why this would be the case. But the consoles would come out, and we saw what happened.

PSP is the fiercest handheld competitor Nintendo has ever faced. Sony pumped in a ton of money into the thing. We call PSP a ‘failure’ because it didn’t outdo the DS.

My interpretation of the PSP shows that what is viable is handheld gaming consoles as those are in demand. But ‘other functions’ such as media consumption will be absolutely destroyed by smartphones as PSP showed. PSP primarily sold as a gaming device, not as a ‘media device’.

Most of the ‘analysts’ out there don’t really care about gaming. They only care about the ‘other media’ which they hoped Sony would establish. Now that Sony doesn’t focus so much on these ‘other media’ anymore in their consoles, I do not hear from these ‘analysts’ anymore. Good riddance.

Advertisements

Categories

%d bloggers like this: